Cool Tool: ETF Stock Finder

July 05, 2018

I’m very excited today to announce the release of a tool our development team has been working on for some time: the ETF Stock Finder.

While no investor should base their asset allocation on the presence or absence of a single stock, one of the most consistently asked questions I get in my inbox is, “How do I find out which ETF owns the most Tesla?” … or Microsoft, or Apple or Bob’s Burgers.

Our goal in building a tool to help answer this FAQ was to make it as simple and intuitive to use as possible. So here’s how to find—and use—this new feature here at ETF.com.

First, you can find a dedicated page in the menu:

 

 

Or you can bookmark this link … http://www.etf.com/etfanalytics/etf-stock-finder ... which will take you to a simple page that lists the most commonly searched-for tickers, new IPOs and widely held stocks.

But I think it’s much cooler to get this info in a few other ways. First, you can enter a ticker on the usual ETF Screener page:

 

 

Or you can click on a U.S. equity holding from the “Fit” section, found in the bar appearing above the Fund Description, in any fund report:

 

 

Or, you can use the true lazy man’s way, which is to simply type “etf.com/stock/AAPL” into your browser. This works the same way that typing “etf.com/SPY” gets you to the fund page for that ETF.

The Stock Pages

So what do you get once you’re there? First, you get the top holders and a text description:

 

 

And then tables to show the top holders in a few different ways. First, by exposure as a fund shareholder:

 

 

Second, by absolute ownership:

 

 

And last, you’ll see a normal finder window that lets you see and sort on the full list of ETFs that hold that stock.

 

 

So What?

So what’s the point? We see our job here at ETF.com as helping advisors and investors of all stripes get as smart as they can about ETFs. I’ve said “know what you own” so may times at this point I should probably get a tattoo, and for sure, our ETF pages do a good job at helping investors do that.

But sometimes what you’re looking for requires a different perspective. Maybe you’re trying to avoid too much overlap in a single name. Maybe you’re trying to see how exposed you are to a given news story. Or maybe you’re just curious how big an influence headline ETF flows are having on your favorite small-cap.

We hope you enjoy this new feature. As always, you can let me know what you think at [email protected], or better yet, join us for a weekly live chat session.

Dave Nadig is managing director of ETF.com. He can be reached at [email protected]

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