Creations In UNL & DNO Resume

By
Cinthia Murphy
January 17, 2013
Share:

A regulatory bump in the road is now history for the energy ETFs ‘UNL’ and ‘DNO.’

 

Creations in the United States 12 Month Natural Gas Fund (NYSEArca: UNL) and the United States Short Oil Fund (NYSEArca: DNO) resumed today after having been halted since Jan. 10 due to a regulatory hurdle.

The updated registration statements United States Commodity Funds had to file for both funds in order to comply with a regulatory requirement were declared effective by the Securities and Exchange Commission today, the company said.

Trading and creations were halted on both funds on Jan. 10 following the filing of the updated statements, with trading resuming that same day, but creations remained halted until the SEC rubber-stamped the paperwork.

The New York Stock Exchange again halted trade in the two ETFs this morning for news pending, and resumed trade at 11:25 a.m. Eastern time.

The ETF provider said this regulatory requirement applies at least once every three years, and it’s normal procedure for funds such as UNL and DNO.

The new filings registered just over 8.9 million shares of DNO and 32.9 million shares of UNL.

UNL had about $43 million in assets and DNO had $13.2 million.

 

ETF.COM CHANNELS

Want to learn more about smart-beta ETFs? Check out our smart-beta guide, essentials library and ETF screener!

ETF DAILY DATA

Vanguard's all-market fund 'VTI' led inflows on Thursday, April 23, as total U.S.-listed ETF assets reached a record of $2.163 trillion.

'VTI,' 'VB' and 'VGK' paced Vanguard's issuer-leading inflows on Thursday, April 23, as total U.S.-listed ETF assets rose to a record $2.163 trillion.

ETF.COM ANALYST BLOGS

By Olly Ludwig

Why is it that some human advisors seem less fond of foreign stocks than robo advisors?

By Dave Nadig

Buying and selling ETFs wisely means understanding the difference between being a buyer and a seller.

By Olly Ludwig

Saving the world as an eco-conscious investor is a tough row to hoe, but ETFs make it a bit easier.

By Olly Ludwig

If you’re puzzled by Israel’s relatively strong stock market performance, don’t forget you’re taking measure of a developed country.