Filings: Foreign Sector ETFs Planned By iShares

By
ETF.com Staff
April 27, 2009
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The iShares sector lineup could be expanding soon to include 10 international ETFs.

 

In a move expected to round out its lineup, iShares has filed to launch 10 international sector exchange-traded funds.

The firm already has some 38 sector ETFs for the U.S. and North America. It also has 11 different global funds focused on industries covering U.S. and foreign markets.

Now, iShares wants to boost its coverage to just non-U.S. developed and emerging markets divvied up by sectors.

No expense ratios were mentioned in the filings. The proposed iShares international sector ETFs will face several competitors, including a full lineup tracking S&P indexes sponsored by State Street Global Advisors. Most have tiny asset bases and charge 0.50% in annual expense ratios.

The proposed ETFs would be:

  • iShares MSCI ACWI ex US Consumer Discretionary Index Fund
  • iShares MSCI ACWI ex US Consumer Staples Index Fund
  • iShares MSCI ACWI ex US Energy Index Fund
  • iShares MSCI ACWI ex US Financials Index Fund
  • iShares MSCI ACWI ex US Health Care Index Fund
  • iShares MSCI ACWI ex US Industrials Index Fund
  • iShares MSCI ACWI ex US Information Technology Index Fund
  • iShares MSCI ACWI ex US Materials Index Fund
  • iShares MSCI ACWI ex US Telecom Services Index Fund
  • iShares MSCI ACWI ex US Utilities Index Fund

 

ETF DAILY DATA

'SPY' lost $2.48 billion on Wednesday, Jan. 28, as net outflows and a lower stock market pulled total U.S.-listed ETF assets below $2 trillion.

'SPY' paced SSgA's issuer-leading outflows on Wednesday, Jan. 28, as net outflows and falling stocks pulled total U.S.-listed ETF below $2 trillion.

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